Charity 3D prints home for Virginia woman in 12 hours

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That’s a seriously speedy construction job.

The future is here, and houses can now be built in a matter of hours with 3D printers.

Nonprofit group Habitat for Humanity recently partnered with the 3D-printing company Alquist to print a home for Williamsburg, Virginia resident — and now, a homeowner — April Springfield. The printing of Springfield’s new three-bedroom, two-bathroom, 1,200-square-foot home’s liquid concrete foundation took just 12 hours. Usually, the process of constructing a home’s foundation takes about four weeks, SWNS reported.

Springfield helped subsidize the cost of her new home by helping construct it, a key tenant of Habitat for Humanity’s home-building program in the area: The houses are assembled cooperatively, in a joint effort between buyers, volunteers and house sponsors.

This entire three-bedroom house was 3D printed using liquid concrete in just 12 hours.
This entire three-bedroom house was 3D printed.
Consociate Media / SWNS
The home was constructed using liquid concrete in just 12 hours.
The home was constructed using liquid concrete in just 12 hours.
Consociate Media / SWNS
The kitchen.
The kitchen.
Consociate Media / SWNS

Indeed, Springfield said she put at least 300 hours of “sweat equity” into building the house, which was finally unveiled to her and her 13-year-old son this month. The collaborative arrangement also made homeownership a reality for Springfield, who makes less than 80 percent of the area’s median income at her job as a local hotel’s laundry facilities supervisor.

Habitat’s Homebuyer Programme has also offered Springfield a mortgage with repayments of no more than 30 percent of her income. The program then uses that money to build more affordable homes in the US.

The build is 1,200 square feet.
The build is 1,200 square feet.
Consociate Media / SWNS
The family room.
The family room.
Consociate Media / SWNS
The bathroom.
The bathroom.
Consociate Media / SWNS

And should anything within her home from electrical outlets to doorknobs break, Springfield has been provided with her own 3D printer, to reprint new ones.

While the liquid concrete printing process may be nontraditional, SWNS reported that the material is actually both relatively environmentally friendly and affordable. Using concrete as a primary building material can cut the cost of construction by up to 15 percent per square foot, the outlet reported. As well, it makes for quality insulation, thus lowering heating and cooling bills, and offers more protection than other materials against tornadoes and hurricanes.

It is also a great insulator so lowers heating and cooling bills, and its strength provides great protection against tornadoes and hurricanes.
It is also a great insulator so lowers heating and cooling bills, and its strength provides great protection against tornadoes and hurricanes.
Consociate Media / SWNS
The building is also EarthCraft certified, meaning it minimizes environmental impacts and will not cost as much to maintain.
The building is also EarthCraft certified, meaning it minimizes environmental impacts and will not cost as much to maintain.
Consociate Media / SWNS
3d printed house virginia
The 1,200 square-foot build was unveiled to the new homeowner April Springfield and her 13-year-old son this month in Williamsburg, Virginia.
Consociate Media / SWNS

In the case of Springfield’s house, the building is also EarthCraft certified, signifying it will be more affordable to maintain and has a comparatively minimal environmental impact.

Springfield’s abode is the first to receive a 3D-printed home through the non-profit’s new program. A second one, in Tempe, Arizona, is set to be unveiled next month.

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